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If I Am Retired Can I Collect SSD?

If I Am Retired, Can I Collect SSD?

In most cases, you cannot collect both Social Security disability (SSD) and retirement benefits. That is because SSD benefits are for those who cannot work but are too young to receive retirement benefits. If someone receives SSD benefits, retirement benefits will take over once he or she hits the age of 66.

Early Retirement & Social Security Disability

That being said, there are circumstances under which a retired person could also collect disability benefits from the Social Security Administration (SSA). This could be the case if someone took an early retirement—an option that is available when someone turns 62 years of age.

Were you disabled before you collected early retirement benefits?

If the SSA agrees that your disability preceded your early retirement, then this means that you were eligible for disability benefits (the same as full retirement benefits) when you were only receiving early retirement benefits (only a percentage). In this case, you could be paid retroactive disability benefits to make up the difference between the two amounts.

Let's say that you had to leave work because of disability and started taking out early retirement benefits. Next, your claim for Social Security disability received approval. Once Social Security realized that you took out early retirement benefits after you were already disabled, you would get back the 25% difference between early retirement and disability benefits for however many months you collected early retirement.

Because you qualified for disability, once you turned 66, you would still receive full retirement benefits even though you already took out early retirement benefits.

Were you disabled after you started collecting early retirement benefits?

In this case, you would not receive any retroactive disability benefits. Also, the early retirement rate would remain in place. Therefore, you would receive only a percentage of your full retirement benefits even after reaching 66 years of age.

What does this mean if you want to take an early retirement as well as apply for a disability claim? Each case is different. In some instances, it may be unclear whether or not a disability claim will get approved. In this case, it may be advisable to hold off on retiring early. In other cases, it will be abundantly obvious that the disability claim will go through, and that early retirement benefits are needed in the meantime. In order to make an informed decision on this crucial point, it is often best to consult a legal professional.

You can discover your possible strategies when you talk to one of the Dallas Social Security disability lawyers at The Zendeh Del Law Firm, PLLC. We are here to help you!