Rheumatoid Arthritis and SSDI Benefits

Rheumatoid Arthritis and SSDI Benefits

If you are suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, you may be able to seek disability based on this condition. Rheumatoid arthritis usually starts in the joints of the hands and feet and progresses to other areas including the knees, hips and shoulders. The symptoms can range in severity, but in some cases this condition can eventually cause joints to become permanently deformed. RA is considered a chronic condition to which there is no cure. Treatments include lifestyle remedies, mediations, therapies and possible surgeries, but they cannot eradicate the presence of the disease.

Thankfully, RA victims that are no longer able to work can petition for SSDI. The SSA provides cash payments to those who are unable to work because of an illness or injury that has lasted for at least a year. If you want to have your disability claim approved, then you'll need to demonstrate to the SSA that you are unable to perform any work on a consistent basis. Because RA can cause swollen and stiff joints, fatigue, fevers and weight loss, it is often easy to prove that you are unable to work while suffering from this serious condition.

You can normally qualify for benefits if you can prove that your condition causes limited ability to function. For example, if you can show that the RA is present in your legs and makes it difficult for you to walk, or affects the joints in your arms and gives you limited mobility, chances are that you can achieve benefits. As well, if you have inflammation or permanent deformity in one of the major joints and involvement of at least two or more organ or body systems, which result in malaise, severe fatigue, or involuntary weight loss, then you can apply for SSDI. You will need to evidence that the RA causes severe limitation in the ability to complete daily tasks or function socially. If you want more information, or if your RA SSDI claim was denied, call a Social Security Disability lawyer at our firm right away.

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